Written by Deborah Hopkinson

The childhood story of America’s first woman astronomer, Maria Mitchell.

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Review:

The illustrations are stunning and the story well -told...

--Buffalo, NY News


From Hopkinson (Birdie's Lighthouse, 1997, etc.) comes another strong, simply told story, based loosely on the life of 19th- century astronomer Maria Mitchell, about a girl with a particular kind of wanderlust. Maria narrates as she helps her mother with her eight siblings, tends to the fire, mends clothing, tells stories. Her heart, however, is on the roof with Papa, as he sweeps the sky with his telescope. When brother Andrew runs away to sea, Maria asks to take his place at her father's side. Hopkinson includes deft references to Galileo and Copernicus, and to the planets, comets, and constellations known at the time, in language that is occasionally poetic. The loose brushwork of the acrylic paintings creates a lovely contrast between the bright heavenly bodies and the deep blue sky. The stylized domestic scenes echo the flat planes of early American portraits as they play against the wide sweep of night.

-- Kirkus Reviews


Written by Corinne Demas

Deborah’s latest children’s book is as heartfelt as a tune sung by a father and child. This tenderly illustrated picture book resounds with love.

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Review:

A hymn to the transforming power of music. Nina's father is the best fiddler she knows -- "The best in the whole state. In the whole country." Early one morning, the two of them leave for a fiddle contest that offers a first prize of $200, money the family desperately needs. Her father plans to play "Nina's waltz," a song that he wrote for her birthday. After several wasps sting his hand and he is unable to play, Nina overcomes her own stage fright and takes his place. Demas's quiet story is accompanied by soft acrylic paintings that echo the peaceful, rural setting. Graceful musical notes appear throughout, dancing serenely across purple-and-blue skies.

-- School Library Journal



Written by Charles Tazewell

One of the most beloved Christmas classics of all time is reintroduced to a another generation of young readers in this beautiful new edition illustrated by Deborah Lanino.

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Review:


Gr 1-3--First released in book form in 1946, this story has since appeared in numerous editions. It tells of a small angel who simply can't get with the program no matter how hard he tries until an understanding elder realizes that he is homesick and is able to retrieve a box of his most treasured possessions from "back home." When it comes time for Jesus to be born on Earth, the Littlest Angel gives his precious box to the Baby, but he is worried that God will think his gift too humble. However, God is pleased indeed, and transforms the box into the Star of Bethlehem. The writing style is rather ornate and full of grandiose words and phrases, but some children will love to hear it read aloud. The oil paintings are muted and full of texture, and not at all sentimental. The celestial choir is multicultural, and the Littlest Angel has red shorts peeking out of his robe. Paul Micich's version (Ideals, 1991) has a glossier "greeting-card" look. This reincarnation of the story will be as popular as its predecessors.--EM

-- School Library Journal